Citizenship FAQs

Citizenship FAQs

Consult Us

Q: I have applied for citizenship and the validity date on my “green card” is going to expire? Do I need to apply for a new “green card”?

Naturalization applicants do not have to renew their green cards if they had applied for citizenship six or more months prior to the expiration date on their Permanent Resident Card. Otherwise, one must apply for a replacement card by filing form I-90 (Applicant to Replace Permanent Resident Card) with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. In addition, we recommend that any applicant who has filed for citizenship and seeks to travel outside the United States should also apply and obtain a renewal of lawful permanent residency prior to travel.

Q: What should I do if I change my address after I have applied for citizenship?

The law requires that individuals staying in the U.S. for more than 30 days inform the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of any change in address within 10 days of the move. Individuals with pending applications for citizenship should notify USCIS of the address change by calling USCIS customer service at 1-800-375-5284 (TTY: 1-800-767-1833) and filing an Alien Change of Address card (Form AR-11) by mail or online at USCIS website. Individuals may also inform the local post office to ensure that mail gets forwarded to the right address.

Q: Can I change my name at the time I become a U.S. citizen?

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services may issue a naturalization certificate under a new name if the individual seeking citizenship and requesting a name change submits documents such as a court order, marriage certificate or divorce decree that proves that the name has been changed according to his/her state’s legal requirements. It also bears noting that it is possible for an applicant to make a name change request in court during the Oath of Allegiance ceremony. If granted, the court can issue a naturalization certificate bearing the new name.

Q: I have lost my naturalization certificate what should I do? What can I do in this situation in order to obtain a new certificate?

If you are in the U.S., you may apply for” application to replacement the citizenship document (Form N-565)” in order to replace your naturalization certificate. If you are outside the U.S. you must submit your application for replacement, to a United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in the U.S. and be willing to come back to the U.S to retrieve the certificate when it’s ready. Please note that it normally takes approximately one year to process a new certificate. In the interim, one may use hi/ her U.S. passport as proof of citizenship.

Q: What are the eligibility requirements to take the take U.S. Government and History test in my native language if I do not suffer from any disability or physical impairment?

Applicants who satisfy any of the following are exempt from the English test and may take the U.S. government and history test in his or her native language: a) Age 50 or older and permanent resident for 20 years or b) Age 55 or older and permanent resident for 15 years. Also, applicants who are 65 or older and have been permanent resident holders for 20 years are eligible to take a scaled down version of the U.S. government and history test in his or her native language.